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Programs

MAY JUNE JULY AUGUST SEPTEMBER OCTOBER NOVEMBER DECEMBER

APRIL

Masonic Magic Lantern Slide – Master Mason’s Lodge, 1880-1900, American, Scottish Rite Masonic Museum & Library Collection, UN2000.0131.49.

 

Friday, April 11, all day

Symposium

"Perspectives on American Freemasonry and Fraternalism"

The symposium, “Perspectives on American Freemasonry and Fraternalism,” seeks to present the newest research on American fraternal groups from the past through the present day. See program and registration information here.

 
 


Courtesy of Melinda Kashuba.

 

Saturday, April 12, 2:00 p.m.

Lecture

Melinda Kashuba, Shasta College:

Organizing Wonder: Using Maps in Family History Research


From sixteenth century maps depicting the location of Irish clans to maps of DNA test results showing ancient migration patterns, family historians use maps in many ways to tell the story of their ancestries. No longer content to use maps for reference, modern genealogists create maps using a variety of software products and social media to research and share their ancestries. Join Melinda Kashuba and explore the wide range of maps family historians employ to research and document their families’ story. You may be inspired to start mapping your own family's journey. After the lecture, the presenter will offer an informal discussion with interested audience members. This program is part of a series related to the Museum and Library’s collection of historic maps. It is free thanks to the generous sponsorship of the Ruby W. and LaVon P. Linn Foundation.

 
 

15-Star Flag, 1794-1818. Rite Masonic Museum & Library, gift of John E. Craver, 95.021.  Photograph by David Bohl.

 

Wednesday, April 23, 1:00 p.m. and 2:30 p.m.

Family Program

Getting to Know Our Flag

April is a great month for flags! This family program explores the origins, history, legends and myths of the American flag. With the Museum’s historically significant 15-star flag as a backdrop, participants will enjoy hands-on activities. Bring family and friends to discover some surprising April flag history.
$5/family (members); $7/family (non-members).
No registration necessary for this approximately one-hour program.



 
 

Lexington Alarm’d Letter, 1775.
Daniel Tyler, Brooklyn, CT. Ink on paper. Scottish Rite Masonic Museum and Library, A95.011.1.

 

Thursday, April 24, 2:00 p.m.

Family Program

The Lexington Alarm

Each year at this time, the Museum displays an exciting piece of American history, the Lexington Alarm Letter. Written on April 19, 1775 by a citizen of Watertown to notify the American colonies near and far that war had begun, the letter still conveys the urgency of the shocking news. Families are invited to work together on hands-on, minds-on activities that explore the moment and the world in which this document was set down. Appropriate for ages 8 through adult.
$6/family (members); $9/family (non-members).
No registration necessary for this approximately 1.5 hour program.




 
 

Scottish Rite 33° Ring, 1998. Irons and Russell Company, New York, NY. Gift of John H. Glenn Jr. in memory and honor of Vern Riffe, a good friend, 33° Mason, and the longest serving Speaker of the Ohio House of Representatives in history, 2000.018a. Photo by David Bohl.

 

Saturday, April 26, 2:00 p.m.

Gallery Talk

A Sublime Brotherhood:  200 Years of Scottish Rite Freemasonry in the Northern Masonic Jurisdiction

Join Aimee E. Newell, the Museum's Director of Collections and curator of the exhibition, to learn about the Scottish Rite's French roots, its founding in America two centuries ago and its evolution into one of the most popular American fraternal groups during the 1900s.  The exhibition includes photos, costumes, and Scottish Rite props, many of which have never previously been on view. Free.

 
 

MAY

“Provost and Judge [7°],” The Rituals of the Ancient & Accepted Scottish Rite of Freemasonry, 1869. Israel Thorndike Hunt (1841-1905), Nashua, NH. Collection of the Scottish Rite Masonic Museum & Library, SC155, R-230. Photo by David Bohl.

 

Saturday, May 17, 2:00 p.m.

Gallery Talk

A Sublime Brotherhood:  200 Years of Scottish Rite Freemasonry in the Northern Masonic Jurisdiction

Join Aimee E. Newell, the Museum's Director of Collections and curator of the exhibition, to learn about the Scottish Rite's French roots, its founding in America two centuries ago and its evolution into one of the most popular American fraternal groups during the 1900s.  The exhibition includes photos, costumes, and Scottish Rite props, many of which have never previously been on view. Free.

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JUNE

Courtesy of David Bosse.

 

Saturday, June 7, 2:00 p.m.

Lecture

David Bosse

Librarian and Curator of Maps, Historic Deerfield

Map and Chart Publishing in Boston in the Eighteenth Century

For much of the 18th century, map publishing in America was a financially precarious undertaking. The same held true in Boston, where individuals from many walks of life ventured into commercial mapmaking. This lecture explores the work of several Boston mapmakers during this period of ad-hoc publishing. This program is part of a series related to the Museum and Library’s collection of historic maps. It is free thanks to the generous sponsorship of the Ruby W. and LaVon P. Linn Foundation.

 
 

Specimen Box, early 1900s. New York, New York. Gift of Dorothy A. and Albert H. Richardson, Jr., 85.53.26. Photograph by David Bohl.

 

Saturday, June 14, 2:00 p.m.

Gallery Talk

Prized Relics: Historic Souvenirs from the Collection


In the 1800s Americans became increasingly interested in collecting souvenirs that physically connected them to important places, people and events in the emerging national story. Fragments of a cherished quilt, gavels made from wood from famous trees, or bits of wood and stone collected on tourists’ journeys all tell us something about their collectors and what places and events they deemed historic. Come explore these and more historic relics from the museum’s collection. Join museum staff for this free gallery tour.

 
 

JULY

Bracelet, mid 1800s. United States, Gift of Marjorie Sumner Guiler and Eleanor B. Litchfield, 82.27. Photograph by David Bohl.

 

Saturday, July 12, 2:00 p.m.

Gallery Talk

Prized Relics: Historic Souvenirs from the Collection


In the 1800s Americans became increasingly interested in collecting souvenirs that physically connected them to important places, people and events in the emerging national story. Fragments of a cherished quilt, gavels made from wood from famous trees, or bits of wood and stone collected on tourists’ journeys all tell us something about their collectors and what places and events they deemed historic. Come explore these and more historic relics from the museum’s collection. Join museum staff for this free gallery tour.

 
 

“Fourteenth Degree,” The Rituals of the Ancient & Accepted Scottish Rite of Freemasonry, 1869. Israel Thorndike Hunt (1841-1905), Nashua, New Hampshire. Collection of the Scottish Rite Masonic Museum & Library, SC155, R-230, Photograph by David Bohl.

 

Saturday, July 26, 2:00 p.m.

Gallery Talk

A Sublime Brotherhood:
200 Years of Scottish Rite Freemasonry in the Northern Masonic Jurisdiction


Join Aimee E. Newell, the museum's Director of Collections and curator of the exhibition, to learn about the Scottish Rite's French roots, its founding in America two centuries ago and its evolution into one of the most popular American fraternal groups during the 1900s.  The exhibition includes photos, costumes, and Scottish Rite materials, many of which have never previously been on view. Free.



 
 

AUGUST

“Lamp or Lighter, ca. 1898. Jacob Stahl, Jr. & Co., New York, New York. Gift of Robert W. Heald, 33°, MSA, 97.021.1.

 

Saturday, August 9, 2:00 p.m.

Gallery Talk

Prized Relics: Historic Souvenirs from the Collection

In the 1800s Americans became increasingly interested in collecting souvenirs that physically connected them to important places, people and events in the emerging national story. Fragments of a cherished quilt, gavels made from wood from famous trees, or bits of wood and stone collected on tourists’ journeys all tell us something about their collectors and what places and events they deemed historic. Come explore these and more historic relics from the museum’s collection. Join museum staff for this free gallery tour.

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SEPTEMBER


Lamp, 1922. Museum purchase, 2000.059.8. Photograph by David Bohl.

 

Saturday, September 6, 2:00 p.m.

Gallery Talk

Prized Relics: Historic Souvenirs from the Collection


In the 1800s Americans became increasingly interested in collecting souvenirs that physically connected them to important places, people and events in the emerging national story. Fragments of a cherished quilt, gavels made from wood from famous trees, or bits of wood and stone collected on tourists’ journeys all tell us something about their collectors and what places and events they deemed historic. Come explore these and more historic relics from the museum’s collection. Join museum staff for this free gallery tour.


 
 

Courtesy of Susan Schulten.

 

Saturday, September 13, 2:00 p.m.

Lecture

Susan Schulten

Professor and Chair, Department of History, University of Denver

Reinventing the Map

We live in a culture saturated with maps. We have become accustomed to making them instantly and representing virtually any type of data. Technology makes this possible, but our contemporary use of maps is rooted in a fundamental shift that took place well over a century ago. Beginning in the nineteenth century Americans began to use maps not only to identify locations and represent the landscape, but to organize, display, and analyze information. Through maps of the environment, the distribution of the institution of slavery, the census, epidemics, and even their own history, Americans gradually learned to view themselves and their nation in altogether new ways. This program, part of a series related to the Museum and Library’s collection of historic maps, is free thanks to the generous sponsorship of the Ruby W. and LaVon P. Linn Foundation.

 
 

OCTOBER


Gavel, ca. 1956. Herbert V. Canfield (1903-2001). Loaned by the Grand Lodge of Masons in Massachusetts, GL2004.2645. Photograph by David Bohl.

 

Saturday, October 4, 12:00 noon

Gallery Talk

Prized Relics: Historic Souvenirs from the Collection

In the 1800s Americans became increasingly interested in collecting souvenirs that physically connected them to important places, people and events in the emerging national story. Fragments of a cherished quilt, gavels made from wood from famous trees, or bits of wood and stone collected on tourists’ journeys all tell us something about their collectors and what places and events they deemed historic. Come explore these and more historic relics from the museum’s collection. Join museum staff for this free gallery tour.

 
 

Courtesy of John Rennie Short.

 

Saturday, October 4, 2:00 p.m.

Lecture

John Rennie Short

Professor, Department of Public Policy, University of Maryland, Baltimore County

Cartographic Encounters:
Native Americans in the Exploration and Mapping of North America

In this lecture Professor Short will outline the role of indigenous people in the exploration and mapping. Drawing on diaries and official reports he will demonstrate how Native Americans were an essential element in the European and American exploration and mapping of North America in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. He will highlight their role as guides, informants and mapmakers. This program, part of a series related to the Museum and Library’s collection of historic maps, is free thanks to the generous sponsorship of the Ruby W. and LaVon P. Linn Foundation.

 
 

NOVEMBER


Courtesy of the MetroBoston DataCommon.

 

Saturday, November 22, 10:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

Workshop

How to Do History with Online Mapping Tools

Digital mapping is being used by more and more historians to create visual representations of historical data. Here in the Boston area, the MetroBoston DataCommon provides free applications that allow everyone and anyone to map publically available data. Learn how to use this accessible online tool to explore historical questions. Joanne Riley, University Archivist at UMass Boston, will share how to explore local history in the Metro Boston area through digital mapping. Staff from the MetroBoston DataCommon will show participants how to make the most of the DataCommon tool. If you are a lay historian, a data fan, a map enthusiast or just fascinated by the power of visualizations, this workshop is for you. It is part of a series related to the Museum and Library’s collection of historic maps and is free thanks to the generous sponsorship of the Ruby W. and LaVon P. Linn Foundation. Space is limited; Registration is required by November 5. Contact: programs@monh.org.

 
 

DECEMBER


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Saturday, December 13, 10:00 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.

Sunday, December 14, 12:00 noon - 4:00 p.m.


Model Trains

An annual favorite, the HUB Division of the National Railroad Association will delight fans large and small with their model train display. $5/family (members); $7/family (non-members).